Ruth for Equality

Dimensions 120.0 x 120.0 CM (W*H)

Materials Fabric and enamel on canvas

  • $10,000.00
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg is an American lawyer and jurist who is an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Ginsburg was appointed by President Bill Clinton and took the oath of office on August 10, 1993. She is the second female justice of four to be confirmed to the court.

Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother, one of her biggest sources of encouragement, died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University, and became a wife and mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg turned to academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women's rights, winning multiple victories arguing before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg has received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down; she has been dubbed the "Notorious R.B.G." in reference to the rapper Notorious B.I.G.

Artists Gillie and Marc Schattner, on August 26, Women’s Equality Day 2019, are bringing to life a dream, the move towards equal representation in women statues.

In a moment of deep self-reflection, they realized they had been contributing to the lack of women representation in their public art. However, the artists decided they could not sit back and let history repeat itself. Something has to change, and so with their new project, ‘Statues for Equality’, they have self-funded ten new women statues.

Because of this project, New York is becoming the first city to change the dynamics considerably - as the ten women are launched as statues the number will jump from 3% to 9%. The project will launch at RXR Realty’s iconic Avenue of the Americas.

Joining ‘Statues for Equality’ are ten portraits of each woman in a groundbreaking new show that expresses diversity and gender equality. Exhibiting alongside their permanent statue sisters at 61 Broadway, NYC, they will be on show for the public for 12 months.

The women are painted on fabric from around the world, just as they as women represent the diversity of womankind, as does the soft materials that embody strength. Each piece has its own texture, shape, and feel.

The women’s faces are depicted in black and white, revealing the fine attention to detail from the artists; each line becomes part of the narrative of the portraits. However, their hair and clothes are full of colour and patterns. Flowing from the women they extend these versions and ideals of how women present themselves in society.

The use of fabric can take literal meaning; even though the material is soft, beautiful, and used as a way to express individuality. Fabric is also a carrier, babies are held close to us in wraps of material; goods and objects are transported for when we cannot hold everything; and it dresses us, for warmth and support.

The metaphor extends into the roles of women, and Gillie and Marc’s clever use of this medium, reminds us again, how important women are to our lives and the basis of society. Fabric is also another way to show our individuality.

Just as the ten women statues, made out of bronze, who will stand larger than life can teach us something about diversity and gender equality; as can these softer, tender moments of intimate and feminine representatives.

For the next 12 months, Gillie and Marc are aiming to paint 100 women, voted for by the public, who inspire greatness in our societies.

#womenforequality will become an extension of #statuesforequality – use the hashtag to vote for the most inspirational women you know, and take a photo with the paintings and statues to share Gillie and Marc’s message of equality.